Reader's Digest Australia - A Comic's World

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foolhardycousingeorge
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Reader's Digest Australia - A Comic's World

Post by foolhardycousingeorge » Sat Feb 11, 2012 2:43 pm

Hello forum members.

I came across an article in the February issue of Reader's Digest Australia.

In it, numerous comedians shared anecdotes about how their early careers were spent doing stand-up comedy.

Those featured include Eric Bana, Rhys Darby, Shaun Micallef and Mick Molloy.

If anyone wishes to read, I could transcribe them here.
".....that's what's ahead here on Martin Molloy; the only radio show with an inner core of sphagnum."

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Post by PicklePepperPiper » Sun Feb 12, 2012 11:37 am

I'd be keen for the Micallef one. Cheers!

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Post by stupidmeatball » Sun Feb 12, 2012 1:46 pm

I'd very much like to read it. If you don't want to transcribe I can scan it for you, if you don't have the facilities to do so (I'd also need the copy in question.)
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Re: Reader's Digest Australia - A Comic's World

Post by foolhardycousingeorge » Mon Feb 13, 2012 12:29 pm

These are the bits from Eric Bana, Mick Molloy, Rhys Darby and Shaun Micallef. Hope that you enjoy reading them....

Not everyone is funny


by Eric Bana

In 1991, at age 23, after urging from his mates, Bana first took to the stage at Melbourne’s Castle Hotel.

Up until then I had assumed that everyone would be as brilliant as Richard Pryor.

But you know, there’s one funny guy and the rest are s***.

But what immediately attracted me to comedy wasn’t the jokes or making points, there was never much of a social conscience to my act.

It was all about people, imitating them, finding their tics and affectations. It’s what motivates people that makes theme funny or sad, not just what they say.

(Excerpt from The Guardian)

Earning the respect of your peers

By Mick Molloy

Comedians can be a pretty mercenary bunch and a room full of comedians can be a very hostile environment, but at the end of the day, you remember why you got into it or who inspired you.

Despite the surface, there’s a lot of respect in the process of earning your stripes and becoming popular as a comedian, while at the same time not forgetting your roots as a comedian.

It’s funny, some of my favorite moments, while they make me feel old, are when I’ve gone down to the Melbourne Comedy Festival and run into a bunch of comics who say,

“Mate, I used to watch you when I was ten years old,” or, “You’re one of the reasons I got into comedy.”

and you can’t help but like it.

As I said, it makes you say, “F*** I’ m old, but that acknowledgment of schools of comedians has sometimes inspired others.

(Excerpt from FHM)



On the laughter of strangers

By Rhys Darby

My first time onstage as a stand-up was in 1995. I was living in Christchurch. New Zealand comedians Mike King and Andrew Clay were on a tour. Their show was advertised in the newspaper. In the ad it also mentioned the opportunity for “budding comedians” to get up on stage for a five-minute open spot during the show. I was very excited when I read this.

After years of being laughed at by most people who met me, finally I was g iven an opportunity to do it legitimately. I wrote some material about fishing and some material about youth fashion, and went in armed with Frank Spencer impressions.

Leading up to the day, I remember thinking, Wait ‘till they get a load of me - I’m the funniest guy I know?

But on the night after watching the pros and waiting for my turn, I was very nervous. I even thought of pulling out. Luckily I took the leap and did it. On stage I sped through my material way too fast, but there was enough laughter to keep me going.

The Frank Spencer impressions worked a treat. Job done. Hooked? Yes.

From that moment I knew I could make strangers laugh in the dark.


Stand-up within a stand-up

By Shaun Micallef


I used to do (stand-up) at the Star & Garter Hotel in South Melbourne.

Jimoein and Bob Franklin used to try their stuff out there a couple of days before they did their TV show, just to see how it went with the audience.

Glenn Robbins would do ten minutes, and I was there every week anyway, so I thought I’d try my hand at it.

It went down all right, but it was a send-up of a stand-up act. It wasn’t really a stand-up act.

Often it was me telling jokes badly, so it was a meta stand-up act.
".....that's what's ahead here on Martin Molloy; the only radio show with an inner core of sphagnum."

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Post by baudrillard » Wed Feb 15, 2012 10:42 pm

Thanks for going to the effort to transcribe that for us all, foolhardy! :)
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Post by menagers » Thu Feb 16, 2012 8:48 am

Thanks so much Foolhardy! How fascinating! Recently at a book event for Preincarnate I spoke to him about his Star & Garter gigs. I got the feeling that he hadn't thought about it for donkeys. Of course, back then, we all assumed that here was a suited Lawyer trying out comedy for the first time. It was ages later when we discovered that he was a hit in the Uni revues.
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